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Elk Grove Street Lights Upgraded to LEDs

The City of Elk Grove, California, recently began retrofitting approximately 10,000 street light bulbs with LEDs in an attempt to save energy and lower costs over the long term. The project was undertaken after a five-year pilot program to assess LED technology.

The ultimate goal of the pilot test: Locate a light that provided comparable brightness to the existing high pressure sodium bulbs the City was using. At the same time, the City needed to significantly reduce energy costs.

The goal of the project was to save at least 50%, and the City has exceeded that number. It now saves between 60% and 70% on each retrofit, according to Jeff Werner, the City’s senior civil engineer. Overall, the LEDs are projected to save the City $400,000 each year. The City is also seeing a large savings in maintenance costs because LEDs last longer than high pressure sodium lights.

The project will be completed by March 2015.

In Other LED News

•    Ireland’s largest secondary school, Gorey Community School, recently underwent an upgrade to its lighting. The project is projected to save 65% in lighting costs for the school. According to Frank Duke, vice-principal of the school, the administration is “delighted” with the retrofit.

•    Mundelein, Illinois, plans to upgrade its streetlights with LED bulbs in 2015 or 2016. The project is projected to reduce the village’s energy costs while also reducing its footprint on the environment. The village plans to retrofit 75% of its streetlights (about 900).

Sources:

www.kcra.com/news/led-bulbs-coming-to-elk-grove-street-lights/29636198

www.verdeled.com/verde-led-have-recently-completed-a-large-scale-lighting-retrofit-in-gorey-community-school-irelands-largest-secondary-school

www.dailyherald.com/article/20141113/news/141119293

Smart Chip Lighting Technology – Supporting the Cities of the Future

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The cities of today are inhabited by 54% of the world’s population. This accounts for 70% of the global energy supply.

As the world population increases (it is estimated to be twice as large by 2050), cities will have an exponentially greater impact on resource consumption and energy usage. Thus it is in cities where sustainable energy measures will have the greatest impact, and where they are of the utmost importance today.

19% of the world’s electricity usage can be attributed to outdated lighting technology. By transitioning to energy efficient lighting solutions, we can drastically reduce that percentage.

A worldwide transition to LED technology would reduce electricity usage by 8% – bringing lighting down to 11% of all electricity used throughout the globe.

Government funds that were previously used to pay for excess electricity consumption can be diverted towards more useful measures such as education and healthcare.

Environment-friendly LED street lights are now replacing outdated street lighting technology that used to rely on mercury, a toxic substance that had to be disposed of in a careful manner. The costs for this waste removal will no longer be required as LED lighting is mercury-free, unlike the high pressure sodium lighting that preceded it. Municipalities will be able to save money by eliminating these mercury disposal costs, and it will also help the environment.

LEDs are brighter than outdated street lights, and a conversion to LED street lighting can help to prevent automotive accidents as well as crime, which in turn can further lower costs for municipalities.

In addition, LED street lights last much longer than outdated street lighting technology, which used to have to be replaced on a regular basis – expensive maintenance contracts can now be reduced or eliminated altogether, saving municipalities even more money.

Converting from outdated street lighting to LED lighting can reduce energy costs by 40%. There is the opportunity for even more savings when smart chip technology is introduced.

When LEDs are connected to smart chip technology for remote management, energy costs can be reduced by 70%. Smart chip LEDs can be dimmed or brightened individually or as a group, providing further savings and giving municipalities more control over their financial future.

Smart chip technology can also be used to provide residents with free WIFI access, as is the case in Plainville, Connecticut, where ESCO Energy Services Company is installing new LED street lights.

For over 20 years, ESCO Energy Services Company has been the leading provider of innovative lighting efficiency solutions throughout New England. Now, ESCO’s comprehensive Municipal Street Light Conversion Program enables your community to cost-effectively take control of your town’s street lighting operations and achieve significant energy cost savings.

ESCO is the only New England — based company qualified to implement the CCM Streetlight Retrofit Program. We help communities control the cost of keeping their streets safe.

Call today to schedule a FREE Street Light System evaluation.

888-ASK-ESCO (275-3726)

To schedule an appointment online, click here.

ESCO Energy Services Company Installs LED Street Lights with Smart Chip Technology in Plainville, Connecticut

 

ESCO Energy Services Company is installing new LED streetlights in Plainville, Connecticut.

In one of the nation’s first street light conversion projects, more than 1,400 energy efficient LED street lights will replace outdated high-pressure sodium lights.

Plainville, Connecticut will save approximately $75,000 per year through the LED retrofit.

In addition, ESCO will be installing smart chips in a number of the street lights to allow for the lights to be dimmed or brightened individually or as a group.

The smart chips will also enable free WIFI access for residents.

ESCO’s comprehensive Municipal Street Light Conversion Program enables your community to cost-effectively take control of your town’s street lighting operations and achieve significant energy cost savings.

ESCO is the only New England — based company qualified to implement the CCM Streetlight Retrofit Program. We help communities control the cost of keeping their streets safe.

Call today to schedule a FREE Street Light System evaluation.

888-ASK-ESCO (275-3726)

To schedule an appointment online, click here.

Charlestown Explores Converting Streetlights to LEDs with ESCO Energy Services Company

By Jessica Iannetta

CHARLESTOWN

— The Board of Commissioners is exploring converting the town’s streetlights to LEDs, a move that could eventually save the town approximately $8,000 a year.

On Tuesday night, the board voted to have ESCO Energy Services Company do an energy audit of the town’s 120 streetlights, which would give the town a better idea of how much it could save from a conversion. The commissioners first started exploring the idea of converting the streetlights in August after hearing a presentation from Jack Hanley of ESCO.

In his presentation, Hanley estimated that it would cost the town about $40,000 to convert all the lights, but with a savings of about $8,000 a year, the conversion would pay for itself in about five years. The $8,000 in savings would come from the lower energy costs of LED lights and from the money Charlestown would save by buying its streetlights from Delmarva Power. Like most municipalities in the country, Charlestown rents its streetlights from a utility company.

“Municipal street light ownership is a relatively new program that’s kind of sweeping the country,” Hanley told the commissioners. “Every month somebody like (Charlestown Town Administrator) Wib (Pumpaly) writes a check and hands it off to the utility and for decades they have been charging exorbitant amounts of money for streetlights you should have owned decades ago. It’s a unique opportunity.”

If Charlestown were to buy the lights from Delmarva, the town would also have to pay for all the maintenance costs. These costs would be significant if the lights aren’t converted to LEDs as the high-pressure sodium bulbs in the lights typically need to be changed out every three to five years. But the LED lights ESCO installs are guaranteed for 10 years and have a life expectancy of 15 to 20 years, Hanley said.

Still, ESCO recommends that for the first 12 to 15 months towns put aside $1 a month per light as a hedge against future maintenance costs. Once the town has a better idea of annual maintenance costs, that amount can be adjusted, Hanley said. He also noted that ESCO only charges for the repairs it performs rather than a flat, annual maintenance fee.

ESCO also offers the option of having a smart chip installed in each light for an additional cost. The smart chip allows the lights to be dimmed or brightened individually or as a group. So, for example, if there’s an accident at night, a particular light or set of lights could be brightened to better illuminate the scene.

The smart chips could also be used to track the locaton bracelets often worn by Alzheimer’s patients or those with autism, a feature town commissioner Renee Capano said she found particularly attractive when she first heard about ESCO at the Maryland Municipal League conference last summer.

The town would also never have another lost dog, Hanley said, because the smart chips can track the computer chips many dogs have to prevent them from being lost. The chips could even be used to provide WiFi, Hanley said.

Even if Charlestown doesn’t want to use all these functionalities right away, installing the chips at the beginning would cost less than installing them a few years down the road.

“Think of it as making your streetlight heads cable ready,” Hanley said. “You don’t have to take all 500 channels. You can take two or three right now and as the functionality is available or desired, you can switch it on or switch it off. It’s very software-centric rather than hardware-centric.”

ESCO, which is based in Lenox, Mass., has worked with towns in Massachusetts, New York and Connecticut on streetlight conversion programs. Charlestown would be the first town ESCO works with in Maryland.

But Charlestown would not be the first town in the region to install LED lights. Last month, Newark, Del.’s city council voted to replace 2,000 streetlights with LEDs at a cost of $459,759. The move is expected to save the city $13,562 in labor costs and about $90,573 in energy costs. Baltimore also converted its 70,000 streetlights to LEDs in 2012.

On Tuesday night, Charlestown commissioners were optimistic about the idea of converting the town’s lights to LEDs as they unanimously approved the energy audit. Town clerk Janine Antoshak also suggested that, once the energy audit is done and the town has more exact numbers, Charlestown might be eligible for some energy grants to cover the initial cost of converting the lights.

Treasurer Ken Confalone called the LED conversion “a very good deal.” He also noted that the town received a grant to install LEDs in town hall and since then, electricity costs for the building have dropped dramatically.

“The benefit for us the next five years is minimal. It’s in the hundreds of dollars,” Confalone said. “But it’s going to have a huge effect on the finances of the town down the road.”

Source: www.cecildaily.com/news/local_news/article_8b43cc3d-03fc-5fce-8311-c944cf0dd644.html

The Right Fit – Choosing a Building-Automation System For Your Retrofit Projects

Two of the most important steps for reducing energy consumption in building retrofits are active energy management and new controls. Building-Automation Systems (BAS) enable dynamic monitoring and the management of energy consumption. This includes: heating, cooling, lighting, and plug loads. Control retrofits and strategies have a payback period of around 3 to 4 years.

Numerous examples of retrofits using BAS show a substantial amount of financial benefits. Building-automation systems are made up of 3 integrated components: wall sensors, software and control modules. These 3 elements enable facility managers to monitor HVAC energy consumption, lighting, plug loads, and other building systems.

The systems can help manage equipment maintenance and replacement costs, saving money in the process. Managers can program their BAS to provide alarms when equipment operates out of spec. BAS can also simplify building commissioning processes in retrofits and new construction. Operating costs of a commissioned building are 8% to 20% less than non-commissioned buildings.

A well-equipped BAS enables control and monitoring of many different building systems. Some of the features to consider are software, the control module, and wall sensors.

Software:
Software is essential for users to access the BAS. 3D graphical interfaces make it easy for people to learn how to use the BAS. Users can access the system from virtually any desktop computer, tablet, or smartphone.

Control Module:
The control module in a building is the central processing unit (CPU) for the BAS. The control module enables the BAS to interact and communicate with building equipment from numerous sources, including HVAC. Here are some of the features that the control module includes:
– Lighting
– Heating and cooling
– Security
– Access control
– Fire safety
– Elevators
– Escalators

The benefits of a well-designed building control module go beyond cost savings when managing building systems. A properly designed BAS can also assist with billing tenants for leased spaces, providing more accurate billing and tracking of rent revenues.

Wall Sensors:
Occupants in the building use wall sensors as their touch point to the BAS. Sleek and attractive sensor designs complement retrofits with contemporary styling. A microset introduced this year has a touch interface similar to a smartphone. Easy to understand icons help the building occupants with the various environmental readings and system status updates. Some of the displayed data includes room and outdoor temperatures, humidity, and CO2 levels. Colored LED lights on the unit indicate to occupants whether the equipment is in heating or cooling mode as well.

Plainville LED Street Light Installation Underway

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By Ken Liebeskind
The Plainville Citizen

ESCO Energy Services, the Massachusetts company awarded the LED street lighting project in Plainville, began converting more than 1,400 high-pressure sodium lights with LED street lights on Nov. 2.

“They started at the north end of town and they’re doing about 60 to 80 lights per day and should finish the job around Thanksgiving,” Town Manager Robert Lee said.

Plainville is the first Connecticut town to install LED street lights with ESCO in a program that was coordinated by the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities.

Kevin Maloney, a CCM spokesperson, said, “Plainville is a model that encourages other towns to go this route. They’re the first to take this important progressive step to provide lighting in a more cost effective way that will generate long and short term savings.”

Jack Hanley, director of business development at ESCO said the cost of installing LED lights is $304 per fixture, which will cost the town $467,000. But $187,000 will be saved through an Eversource rebate, reducing the cost to $280,000. The town will also save $77,000 annually on the reduced energy cost of LED lights – $33,000 for LED lights compared with $100,000 for sodium lamps.

Lee said the move to LED lights “is a better way to do things. We’ll save money on electric costs and get better performance from the LED lights.”

Plainville also plans to install chips in some of the LED lights in the downtown area that will enable free Wifi access for residents. “We’re looking for advertisers who want to be on the network so we can generate revenue to pay for operational costs,” Lee said.

ESCO will work with the town to negotiate an agreement with Comcast, ATT or another Internet carrier to provide Wifi service.

Source: www.plainvillecitizen.com/news/allnews/7991264-129/plainville-led-street-light-installation-underway.html

ESCO’s First LED Install on Street Light Conversion Project in Plainville, Connecticut

In one of the nation’s first street light conversion projects, more than 1,400 energy efficient LED street lights will replace outdated high-pressure sodium lights.

Plainville, Connecticut will save approximately $75,000 per year through the LED retrofit.

ESCO is the only New England — based company qualified to implement the CCM Streetlight Retrofit Program. We help communities control the cost of keeping their streets safe.

Call today to schedule a FREE Street Light System evaluation.

888-ASK-ESCO (275-3726)

To schedule an appointment online, click here.

 

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ESCO Energy Services Company Retrofits Street Lights in Plainville, Connecticut

ESCO Energy Services Company is adding new streetlights to the downtown area in Plainville, Connecticut.

More than 1,400 energy efficient LED street lights will replace outdated high-pressure sodium lights.

The project has been approved by the town council. The town will save approximately $75,000 per year through the LED retrofit.

The new LED street lights will allow the town to save tens of thousands of dollars on an annual basis. The work by ESCO Energy Services Company will begin in September.

Source: www.wfsb.com/story/29751272/plainville-swapping-street-lights-and-adding-free-wi-fi-downtown

LED Project in Pittsburgh Expands to Residential Neighborhoods

During 2012, Carnegie Mellon’s Remaking Cities Institute (RCI) led a huge project that included replacing 3,300 sodium and mercury vapor streetlights with LED bulbs in more than 30 business districts. Now, the RCI plans to help put LEDs in 90 Pittsburgh residential neighborhoods.

The Institute will create and propose recommendations, as well as technical specs, for more than 37,000 neighborhood streetlights that use LED bulbs. For the new project, RCI will assess the results achieved during 2012 within the business districts that switched to LEDs. Measurements will include how the LEDs affected security, traffic, crime and cost savings, according to RCI Director Don Carter, the study’s principal investigator.

Carter mentioned that while LEDs are more expensive than sodium vapor bulbs, he believes the research will reveal that the initial phase of the project was a great investment economically, according to www.cmu.edu.

Carter stated that LEDs last 7 – 10 years, while sodium vapor lights only last 2 – 3 years. He also stated that LEDs use approximately 1/7 of the energy, so the initial investment is paid back quickly. Carter also noted that other benefits of LEDs include better directional lighting and less maintenance, as well as improved energy efficiency and safety.

To find out more about the RCI project, visit www.cmu.edu/piper/stories/2015/march/led-project.html.